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Health Health Care PA Senators Politics Senator Specter

Specter Now Supports a Public Option

Senator Specter has been traveling the state of Pennsylvania these past few weeks.  He has taken the time to meet with his constituents.  This past weekend, he attended the Berks County Democratic Committee Meeting and spoke with precinct leaders from Berks County.  Yesterday, he met with a group of health reform advocates from Pennsylvania.  He now supports a public option.

Speaking moments ago to a large and animated crowd of union organizers and health reform advocates in a brewing house just North of the Capitol, Sen. Arlen Specter (D-PA) said he supports a public insurance option.

“Schumer has it right about having a public component,” Specter said.

Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-NY) has taken a lead role on negotiations over the public option in the Senate Finance Committee, and earlier this year proposed a compromise: the committee’s health care bill should include a public plan, he said, but one that competes on a level playing field with other insurers. Such an entity wouldn’t be able to use its sheer size to set prices the way Medicare does–but it could nonetheless incur savings in a host of other ways, and in so doing drive down the cost of health insurance in the private market.

Perhaps more importantly, though, the Schumer proposal is in line with the principles of the major reform campaign Health Care for America Now–and, as such, just about every major health care and labor organization in the country.

Sounds like Senator Specter may be listening to the voters of Pennsylvania.

“Health care is a right,” Specter said. “Your presence here has a big effect. You will get health care this year.”

I’ll still be watching his voting record.

Categories
Health News PA Senators Pennsylvania Politics

Specter And The Insurance Money UPDATE

From project at Crooks and Liars…

Here is a list of elected people taking payoffs to cheat the American people and the amounts of bribes being taken. This is just from health care and insurance.
It is mind boggling to think how much these people are taking from others!
Arlen Specter (R-D- PA- $4,026,933)
Max Baucus (DLC- MT- $2,833,731)
Mitch McConnell (R-KY- $2,758,468)

And when you just go right to Big Insurance, the non-presidential candidates who got the biggest legalized bribes were the 7 senators who have been tasked with the job of killing single-payer:

Ben Nelson (DLC-NE- $1,196,799)
Max Baucus (DLC- MT- $1,184,113)
Joe Lieberman (DLC- CT- $1,036,302)
Arlen Specter (R-D- PA- $1,035,530)
Chuck Schumer (D-NY- $981,400)
Mitch McConnell (R-KY- $929,207)
Chuck Grassley (R-IA- $884,724)

There will be a health care rally in Washington, DC on June 25 starting at 11:30.  This is your chance to meet with Senator Specter and tell him how you feel about the public option for health care.

Now that Arlen Specter is a Democrat, let’s see if he chooses his constituents over the insurance industry.

UPDATE:  Here’s a link to the Rovian talking points.

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Congress Democrats Elections PA Senators Pennsylvania Poll Republicans Senator Specter

Two Polls That Should Scare The Crap Out Of PA Dem’s

May 6, 2009

Public Opinion StrategiesPennsylvania

Favorable / Unfavorable
Sen. Arlen Specter (D): 50 / 40 (chart)
Pat Toomey (R): 29 / 13
Rom Ridge (R): 67 / 18
Peg Luksik (R): 5 / 3
Joe Sestak (D) 15 / 3

2010 Senate – Republican Primary
Ridge 51, Roomey 21, Luksik 2
Ridge 60, Toomey 23

2010 Senate – Democratic Primary
Specter 57, Sestak 20

2010 Senate – General Election
Specter 49, Toomey 40
Ridge 48, Specter 41

(source)

May 6, 2009

Susquehanna Polling & Research

Pennsylvania

2010 Senate – General Election
Specter 42, Toomey 36
Ridge 39, Specter 38

Categories
Labor and Unions PA Senators Pennsylvania Politics

Arlen Specter and the Employee Free Choice Act

Yesterday, I sent an email to PA Senator Arlen Specter asking him to support the Employee Free Choice Act.  This is his response.

Dear Pennsylvania Constituent,

After giving exhaustive consideration to the Employee Free Choice legislation, I have decided to oppose the bill for reasons specified in my Senate floor statement which is contained below or you may read here and watch here.

I remain open to working to correct the imbalance which exists with so many jobs being exported and substantial labor losses in areas like pensions and health care.

In my floor statement, I have also laid out some suggested revisions to the National Labor Relations Act which could provide the basis for correcting the current imbalance.

Sincerely,

Arlen Specter

Here is Senator Specter’s full floor statement:

Senator Specter’s full floor statement, including the appendix, follows:

I have sought recognition to state my position on a bill known as the Employee Free Choice Act, also known as card check. My vote on this bill is very difficult for many reasons. First, on the merits, it is a close call and has been the most heavily lobbied issue I can recall. Second, it is a very emotional issue with Labor looking to this legislation to reverse the steep decline in union membership and business expressing great concern about added costs which would drive more companies out of business or overseas. Perhaps, most of all, it is very hard to disappoint many friends who have supported me over the years, on either side, who are urging me to vote their way.

In voting for cloture – that, is to cut off debate – in June 2007, I emphasized in my floor statement and in a law review article that I was not supporting the bill on the merits, but only to take up the issue of labor law reform. Hearings had shown that the NLRB was dysfunctional and badly politicized. When Republicans controlled the Board, the decisions were for business. With Democrats in control, the decisions were for labor. Some cases took as long as eleven years to decide. The remedies were ineffective.

Regrettably, there has been widespread intimidation on both sides. Testimony shows union officials visit workers’ homes with strong-arm tactics and refuse to leave until cards are signed. Similarly, employees have complained about being captives in employers’ meetings with threats of being fired and other strong-arm tactics.

On the merits, the issue which has emerged at the top of the list for me is the elimination of the secret ballot which is the cornerstone of how contests are decided in a democratic society. The bill’s requirement for compulsory arbitration if an agreement is not reached within 120 days may subject the employer to a deal he or she cannot live with. Such arbitration runs contrary to the basic tenet of the Wagner Act for collective bargaining which makes the employer liable only for a deal he or she agrees to. The arbitration provision could be substantially improved by the last best offer procedure which would limit the arbitrator’s discretion and prompt the parties to move to more reasonable positions.

In seeking more union membership and negotiating leverage, Labor has a valid point that they have suffered greatly from outsourcing of jobs to foreign countries and losses in pension and health benefits. President Obama has pressed Labor’s argument that the middle class needs to be strengthened through more power to unions in their negotiations with business. The better way to expand labor’s clout in collective bargaining is through amendments to the NLRA rather than on eliminating the secret ballot and mandatory arbitration. Some of the possible provisions for such remedial legislation are set forth in an appendix to this statement.

In June 2007, the vote on the Employee Free Choice Act was virtually monolithic: 50 Senators, Democrats, voted for cloture and 48 Republicans against. I was the only Republican to vote for cloture. The prospects for the next cloture vote are virtually the same. No Democratic Senator has spoken out against cloture. Republican Senators are outspoken in favor of a filibuster. With the prospects of a Democratic win in Minnesota, yet uncertain, it appears that 59 Democrats will vote to proceed with 40 Republicans in opposition. If so, the decisive vote would be mine. In a highly polarized Senate, many decisive votes are left to a small group who are willing to listen, reject ideological dogmatism, disagree with the party line and make an independent judgment. It is an anguishing position, but we play the cards we are dealt.

The emphasis on bipartisanship is, I think, misplaced. There is no special virtue in having some Republicans and some Democrats take similar positions. The desired value, really, is independent thought and an objective judgment. It obviously can’t be that all Democrats come to one conclusion and all Republicans come to the opposite conclusion by expressing their individual objective judgments. Senators’ sentiments expressed in the cloakroom frequently differ dramatically from their votes in the well of the Senate. The nation would be better served, in my opinion, with public policy determined by independent, objective legislators’ judgments.

The problems of the recession make this a particularly bad time to enact Employees Free Choice legislation. Employers understandably complain that adding a burden would result in further job losses. If efforts are unsuccessful to give Labor sufficient bargaining power through amendments to the NLRA, then I would be willing to reconsider Employees’ Free Choice legislation when the economy returns to normalcy.

I am announcing my decision now because I have consulted with a very large number of interested parties on both sides and I have made up my mind. Knowing that I will not support cloture on this bill, Senators may choose to move on and amend the NRLA as I have suggested or otherwise. This announcement should end the rumor mill that I have made some deal for my political advantage. I have not traded my vote in the past and I would not do so now.

***

First of all… this is NOT the “card check” bill.  There is no “card check” in this bill so the Senator needs to stop being dishonest with his constituents.  Senator Specter does have a habit of bending the truth.  Remember the bouncing single bullet that killed President Kennedy?  That story is unbelievable.  Then there was Specter’s attack on Anita Hill during the Clarence Thomas hearings.  He dismissed her accusations as lies.  Senator Specter should have spoken with other women about sexual harassment on the job.  Maybe he would have learned that it is not easy for a woman to speak up and accuse her manager of sexual harassment.

So Senator Specter has decided to NOT support labor and unions in Pennsylvania even though Pennsylvanians are losing their jobs to places like China and India.  If he doesn’t care about us, then we won’t care about re-electing him in 2010.  This seat has now become very viable for any Democrat to fill.  Republicans really don’t care about “Main Street”.